Cherokee wheel lug bolts suck - Page 8 - 2014+ Jeep Cherokee Forums
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post #71 of 81 (permalink) Old 05-12-2017, 10:19 PM
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Originally Posted by Snowhawk2015 View Post
[

The first scuff kind of hurt, but now it's part of doing business. See photos. FYI, get a torque wrench and carry it with you, 100 ft-lb.

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I actually just picked one up to carry with me.

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post #72 of 81 (permalink) Old 05-13-2017, 09:15 AM
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had the rare privilege of changing out a flat tire yesterday. was out of state driving thru daughter's campus looking to pick her up as she finished her last final exam of the semester. had a camera in one hand & was a little distracted trying to find the correct bldg. hit a curb & heard that horrible hissing sound no one ever wants to hear. not happy considering I had to load the vehicle to the gills to bring her home for the summer. found a relatively peaceful spot to do the changeover by hand. called her & she walked over to meet me. she got to see 1st hand how to execute the procedure & even helped w a few tasks.

after I got it off the car, I couldn't see any damage to the tire so thought maybe I just popped the bead or something, but once I attached my pump I could feel the hissing from a slit near the bead. as I got the gear out, I was wondering what my experience would be like with the recent nuts & tire shop torquing. but all was well, got them off w/o issue. the OEM wrench was just long enough to provide me enough torque to remove them. not sure my daughter would be able to. the breaker bar I threw in my cargo area is not the correct diameter to slip over the OEM tool, which is actually, annoyingly tapered. will have to dig thru my pile of pipe in my basement for a suitable short length to stow

finding the jack point was easy. the tool is used to crank the jack, as well as remove the bolts. clever. it occurred to me that maybe I should carry a cpl of the extra new bolts I bought. but all bolts are in excellent shape thanks to my recent bolt fiasco. luckily I carry a full size spare due to beach permit rules. also fortunately the recent pre-owned tires I just installed were only 1.5/32nds less than new tire so I had no concern putting it on the front. checked all the pressures & made the new tire match

getting the replacement wheel on using the provided threaded stick was interesting. the stick doesn't really have the same diameter as the bolts so it only marginally helps. you still have to move the wheel so the 1st bolt can be threaded. all the bolts looked good & were clean. no lube but they all threaded on well & I torqued them the same as they were when I removed them. it was a good lesson for daughter to see that alternating tightening procedure. probably should have let her try torquing one of them. but she did help jacking up & down

no issues driving loaded at highway speed. got home & threw my temp spare in the cargo area & ordered another pre-owned tire at a matching tread depth. turns out I used up .5/32nds since I installed this set so shopping for an exact match was interesting. glad I remeasured across all treads on all tires before ordering. still think I didn't do any harm driving on a dry highway w the new tire 2/32nds deeper than the rest. if I had thought to measure them all & found out the difference was 2/32nd instead of my presumed 1.5/32nds I might have considered putting the new tire on the rear. but roadside with only the OEM equipment that would have been a real drag man

anyone know why exactly the temp spare has to be put on the back? is it diameter or is it some other combination of reasons?

this is my full size spare




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Last edited by rumrunner; 05-13-2017 at 09:19 AM.
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post #73 of 81 (permalink) Old 05-13-2017, 09:45 AM
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had the rare privilege of changing out a flat tire yesterday. was out of state driving thru daughter's campus looking to pick her up as she finished her last final exam of the semester. had a camera in one hand & was a little distracted trying to find the correct bldg. hit a curb & heard that horrible hissing sound no one ever wants to hear. not happy considering I had to load the vehicle to the gills to bring her home for the summer. found a relatively peaceful spot to do the changeover by hand. called her & she walked over to meet me. she got to see 1st hand how to execute the procedure & even helped w a few tasks.

after I got it off the car, I couldn't see any damage to the tire so thought maybe I just popped the bead or something, but once I attached my pump I could feel the hissing from a slit near the bead. as I got the gear out, I was wondering what my experience would be like with the recent nuts & tire shop torquing. but all was well, got them off w/o issue. the OEM wrench was just long enough to provide me enough torque to remove them. not sure my daughter would be able to. the breaker bar I threw in my cargo area is not the correct diameter to slip over the OEM tool, which is actually, annoyingly tapered. will have to dig thru my pile of pipe in my basement for a suitable short length to stow

finding the jack point was easy. the tool is used to crank the jack, as well as remove the bolts. clever. it occurred to me that maybe I should carry a cpl of the extra new bolts I bought. but all bolts are in excellent shape thanks to my recent bolt fiasco. luckily I carry a full size spare due to beach permit rules. also fortunately the recent pre-owned tires I just installed were only 1.5/32nds less than new tire so I had no concern putting it on the front. checked all the pressures & made the new tire match

getting the replacement wheel on using the provided threaded stick was interesting. the stick doesn't really have the same diameter as the bolts so it only marginally helps. you still have to move the wheel so the 1st bolt can be threaded. all the bolts looked good & were clean. no lube but they all threaded on well & I torqued them the same as they were when I removed them. it was a good lesson for daughter to see that alternating tightening procedure. probably should have let her try torquing one of them. but she did help jacking up & down

no issues driving loaded at highway speed. got home & threw my temp spare in the cargo area & ordered another pre-owned tire at a matching tread depth. turns out I used up .5/32nds since I installed this set so shopping for an exact match was interesting. glad I remeasured across all treads on all tires before ordering. still think I didn't do any harm driving on a dry highway w the new tire 2/32nds deeper than the rest. if I had thought to measure them all & found out the difference was 2/32nd instead of my presumed 1.5/32nds I might have considered putting the new tire on the rear. but roadside with only the OEM equipment that would have been a real drag man

anyone know why exactly the temp spare has to be put on the back? is it diameter or is it some other combination of reasons?

this is my full size spare
Nice job and nice wheel !

I'm no FWD / transaxle expert, but I wouldn't worry about the 2/32" difference. Front diff isn't *locked*.

As far as tools for this job go : the tiny OEM tool works only on properly torqued bolts that are unseized, for people with adequate strenght. I think the ideal toolkit for roadside tire changes are a 1/2" drive 24" breaker bar with the appropriate socket (19mm in your case), and I like to have a minimalist 1/2" drive ratchet kit onboard (or 3/8" drive works too). The ratchet is really helpful for doing the quick-on quick-off part of bolt removing/installing, and can also be used for more efficient jack operation. A good ol' cross works for these purposes too, but who carries these anymore and they are kinda bulky.

The 24" breaker bar can handle seized bolts/nuts much better than any short OEM tool, and will make the whole tire changing experience a lot less stressful for those with lesser strenght. Wrap the thing in a towel (or foam pipe insulation) to prevent it from banging around in the spare tire compartment.

Good thing you had that full size spare !
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Last edited by Mark_; 05-13-2017 at 09:48 AM. Reason: it's pipe insulation, not insultation heh
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post #74 of 81 (permalink) Old 05-13-2017, 10:02 AM
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I wouldn't worry about the 2/32" difference

As far as tools for this job go : the tiny OEM tool works only on properly torqued bolts that are unseized, for people with adequate strenght. I think the ideal toolkit for roadside tire changes are a 1/2" drive 24" breaker bar with the appropriate socket (19mm in your case), and I like to have a minimalist 1/2" drive ratchet kit onboard (or 3/8" drive works too). The ratchet is really helpful for doing the quick-on quick-off part of bolt removing/installing, and can also be used for more efficient jack operation. A good ol' cross works for these purposes too, but who carries these anymore and they are kinda bulky.

The 24" breaker bar can handle seized bolts/nuts much better than any short OEM tool, and will make the whole tire changing experience a lot less stressful for those with lesser strenght. Wrap the thing in a towel (or foam pipe insulation) to prevent it from banging around in the spare tire compartment.

Good thing you had that full size spare !
I'll take this under advisement. THANK YOU

I had a ratcheting box end wrench for my hitch cargo carrier threaded bolt, but soon realized a ratchet socket set would be easier & faster, then remembered I had one stowed w my spare. I only used it on the threaded pin. now you have me thinking of what else to have on hand for tire changing. thanks

the scissor jack is really compact & not sure there'd be clearance for a traditional cross type tire iron. but yeah I remember those, they were handy. might still have one in the basement somewhere. thanks also for the bolt head size. I know I have a torque wrench in my basement tool dresser & probably have a 3/8 drive 19mm deep socket too

yeah, the full size spare was very nice (highly recommend that for EVERYONE). not happy about driving home w/o another spare. explained to daughter if I was driving cross country I've have the temp spare on the roof as additional backup
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post #75 of 81 (permalink) Old 05-13-2017, 10:16 AM
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I always used to position the OEM tool so it was slightly angled upwards then would stand on the bar and use my body weight to loosen the lug nuts, if I couldn't do it by hand. I've had to change plenty of tires, and found this was a quick and effective way to handle seized or stuck nuts.

As a side note, my Trailhawk came with a package of 4 extra lug bolts in the glove box. I thought this was standard for everyone, but I'm guessing not judging by the previous posts.
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post #76 of 81 (permalink) Old 05-13-2017, 10:35 AM
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I'll take this under advisement. THANK YOU

I had a ratcheting box end wrench for my hitch cargo carrier threaded bolt, but soon realized a ratchet socket set would be easier & faster, then remembered I had one stoyed w my spare. I only used it on the threaded pin. now you have me thinking of what else to have on hand for tire changing. thanks

the scissor jack is really compact & not sure there's be clearance for a traditional cross type tire iron. but yeah I remember those, they were handy. might still have one in the basement somewhere. thanks also for the bolt head size. I know I have a torque wrench in my basement tool dresser & probably have a 3/8 drive 19mm deep socket too

yeah, the full size spare was very nice (highly recommend that for EVERYONE). not happy about driving home w/o another spare. explained to daughter if I was driving cross country I've have the temp spare on the roof as additional backup
Driving on the spare is like... descending with the emergency parachute... You kinda wish you had another one as backup but you don't LOL.
Some trivia here : when you use the emergency chute, the person who packed it gets a bottle of whiskey. They get the whiskey from you because a) you are still alive so able to go out and buy it, and b) because you want the person who packs emergency chutes to always be aware they are doing... a life saving job.

Some KLs (and other SUVs/cars) now ship without a spare altogether, they just have a small compressor and a bottle of goo for minor flat repair.
Roadside assistance and modern tires mean we rarely get a flat anymore, except whe off-roading maybe, but we've all kinda rusty I guess.
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post #77 of 81 (permalink) Old 05-13-2017, 03:26 PM
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grabbed the extra 4 new bolts, torque wrench & 6 point 19mm deep socket as backup. when I tried the socket on the new bolts, they were fine. but on 2 of the 5 wheel bolts felt less than fine. I wonder if, I, myself, damaged 2 of them just by changing the flat with the OEM tool?!? (either loosening or tightening the bolts)

I guess when I get the replacement tire mounted, I'll ask the tire shop to replace the 2 funky bolts with new. then I'll be down to only 2 extra OEM bolts

it is ridiculous that these bolt heads are so fragile. maybe the OEM tool should be an actual torque wrench?

I def. recommend a deep socket to help clear the wheel & tire w the handle


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post #78 of 81 (permalink) Old 05-13-2017, 04:07 PM
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I always used to position the OEM tool so it was slightly angled upwards then would stand on the bar and use my body weight to loosen the lug nuts, if I couldn't do it by hand. I've had to change plenty of tires, and found this was a quick and effective way to handle seized or stuck nuts.

As a side note, my Trailhawk came with a package of 4 extra lug bolts in the glove box. I thought this was standard for everyone, but I'm guessing not judging by the previous posts.
Standing on those tools does add a lot or power (torque) when you need it, but it's a balancing act and you also have to make sure the tool isn't crooked on the nut/bolt... and of course the heavier you are, the less acrobatics are required
Having a 24" breaker bar gives you that extra torque with much less weight/force needed at the handle, so a much *easier* way to get those stuck/seized bolts going.

BTW : those 4 extra bolts you have are there because your dealer installed 4 lock bolts on your TH, and those 4 bolts were taken out for that purpose

Quote:
Originally Posted by rumrunner View Post
grabbed the extra 4 new bolts, torque wrench & 6 point 19mm deep socket as backup. when I tried the socket on the new bolts, they were fine. but on 2 of the 5 wheel bolts felt less than fine. I wonder if, I, myself, damaged 2 of them just by changing the flat with the OEM tool?!? (either loosening or tightening the bolts)

I guess when I get the replacement tire mounted, I'll ask the tire shop to replace the 2 funky bolts with new. then I'll be down to only 2 extra OEM bolts

it is ridiculous that these bolt heads are so fragile. maybe the OEM tool should be an actual torque wrench?

I def. recommend a deep socket to help clear the wheel & tire w the handle
It is difficult to apply torque perfectly with those OEM tools... so damaging a capped bolt is not that difficult if the tool's head is just a hair off axis... so yes it's possible.

Another tip : for sockets that you use on lug bolts or nuts, it's a good idea to wrap some plastic or nylon tape on at least the bottom 3", to prevent wheel damage when you accidentally bang them against the wheel, or even inside the lug hole. Electrical tape is good, so is duct tape, but of course Gorilla tape is more robust so will last longer. I've also use good ol' white bandage tape (cloth) and hockey tape would work also. Any tape that prevents metal on metal banging. I make sure to have tape down at the very bottom of the socket and I even allow an extra 1/16" beyond the socket, just to be sure I don't hit the bottom of lug holes with metal. They also sell impact-ready sockets for wheels, which have an outer nylon sleeve, perfect for this purpose.

Last tip : if you already have an SAE socket kit, then 3/4" is very-very close to 19mm and will do the job. 3/4" is actually 19.05mm (0.05mm is 0.002").
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post #79 of 81 (permalink) Old 05-13-2017, 05:45 PM
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.........Wrap the thing in a towel (or foam pipe insulation) to prevent it from banging around in the spare tire compartment.
I like the foam pipe insulation trick. Great idea!
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post #80 of 81 (permalink) Old 05-13-2017, 07:05 PM
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I always used to position the OEM tool so it was slightly angled upwards then would stand on the bar and use my body weight to loosen the lug nuts, if I couldn't do it by hand. I've had to change plenty of tires, and found this was a quick and effective way to handle seized or stuck nuts.

As a side note, my Trailhawk came with a package of 4 extra lug bolts in the glove box. I thought this was standard for everyone, but I'm guessing not judging by the previous posts.
Did you by chance have lock nuts (bolts) fitted and these were the 4 removed? Find it odd to have freebies thrown in!

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